Leek & salmon parcels

Leek & salmon parcels

“These are simple and elegant – and easy on the washing-up. You could always prep these parcels the evening before, then simply pop them in the oven as soon as you get in the door. ”


SERVES 4
COOKS IN 40 MINUTES
DIFFICULTY NOT TOO TRICKY

Ingredients
50 g unsalted butter
2 medium leeks
4 salmon fillets , skin off, scaled, pin-boned, from sustainable sources
8 tablespoons dry vermouth , or dry white wine
4 tablespoons organic chicken stock
1 tablespoon baby capers
a few sprigs of fresh dill

Method
Preheat the oven to 200ºC/400ºF/gas 6.
Melt the butter in a non-stick frying pan over a medium heat. Cut out four 40cm squares of greaseproof paper and brush with a little melted butter. Trim the leeks, then julienne or cut into matchsticks and sauté in the butter for 6 to 8 minutes, or until lightly golden. Season well.
Divide half of the leeks between the paper. Place a salmon fillet on each, season, and spoon over 2 tablespoons of vermouth, 1 tablespoon of stock and the remaining leeks. Scatter over the capers. Finely chop and scatter over the dill. Fold up the sides of the paper and scrunch up to make secure parcels.
Place the parcels on a baking sheet and cook for 15 minutes, or until the salmon is cooked. Open the parcels at the table.

Read more at https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/fish-recipes/leek-salmon-parcels/

Coconut pie crust, gluten free with coconut oil

Coconut pie crust, gluten free with coconut oil

A delicious and easy gluten free coconut pie crust made in a food processor with only wholesome ingredients. A great clean food recipe for pie lovers. Perfect to make a pumpkin pie, apple pie or any other sweet pie.

Servings: 8 people
Calories: 267 kcal
Author: Carine

Ingredients
1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut
1/2 cup Almond Meal Flour
1/4 cup Virgin Organic Coconut Oil, melted + 1 tsp. to oil the pan
2 eggs
1 tbsp. erythritol or coconut sugar (replace by 1 tsp salt for savory pie)
1 tbsp. vanilla extract (optional for savory pie)

Instructions
Preheat oven to 170 C (340F). Oil a loose bottom pie pan (10 inches) with 1 teaspoon of coconut oil. Set aside.

In a food processor using the S blade attachment, add all the ingredients shredded coconut, almond meal flour, melted coconut oil, eggs, erythritol and vanilla extract.

Blend on high speed for 1-2 minutes or until a dough ball is forming (as you can see in the post picture).

It could be slightly crumbly. If it is, simply transfer the dough onto a hard surface and using your hands gather the crumble pieces together to form a ball of dough. It will stick and hold perfectly together

Place the dough ball between two pieces of plastic wraps. Press the dough ball with your hand and start rolling with a roller pin until thin – about half cm thickness.

Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and flip over the rolled dough onto a 26 cm (10 inches) loose bottom pie pan previously oiled with a teaspoon of coconut oil. Remove the last piece of plastic wrap. If the dough break or crumble during the transfer it is easy to use your finger to fill the gaps in the pan. Simply press the dough onto the empty areas until you cover all the pan with the dough.

Pre bake at 170 C (340F) for 20-30 minutes or until golden brown

Always unmold carefully after at least 3-4 hours of cooling process inside the pan. This crust is very fragile so use a loose bottom pan and grease very well with butter or coconut oil.

Recipe Notes
Note 1 :

If you are using a filling that need to be bake like pumpkin pie filling, add the filling in the pre-baked crust and return to the oven until the filling is set. If cold filling is used like custard or fresh fruits, wait until the crust has fully cool down before adding anything inside.

Note 2:

For a savory pie don’t add the erythritol and vanilla extract. Replace those ingredients by 1 teaspoon of sea salt.

 

Read more at www.sweetashoney.co

Low Carb Baked Chicken and Cauliflower Rice

Low Carb Baked Chicken and Cauliflower Rice

Ingredients

For the cauliflower rice:

7 cups finely chopped raw cauliflower
1/4 cup chopped parsley
1/3 cup pitted green olives, quartered (optional)
2 Tbsp lemon zest (optional)
2 Tbsp lemon juice (optional)
1 cup chicken stock
1/4 tsp black pepper
1 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp garlic powder
2 Tbsp olive oil

For the baked chicken:

2 lbs chicken pieces (drumsticks, thighs, or breasts)
2 tsp salt
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp black pepper
1 tsp onion powder
1 tsp paprika (smoked if you have it)

Instructions

Combine all of the cauliflower rice ingredients together in a large bowl and mix thoroughly. Spread out in a 33cmX23cm (13 x 9) baking dish.
Combine all of the chicken seasonings in a small bowl. Rub all over the chicken pieces. Place the chicken pieces on top of the cauliflower rice. Sprinkle any remaining seasoning over the top.
Bake at 200C/375F degrees for 45 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and the skin is crisp. Serve hot.

Read more at LowCarbBakedChickenAndCauliflowerRice

Gingerbread Cookies (Low Carb, Paleo,Sugar-Free )

Gingerbread Cookies (Low Carb, Paleo,Sugar-Free )

 

Ingredients
2 cups Almond flour
1 tbsp Cinnamon
1 1/2 tsp Ground ginger
1/4 tsp Ground cloves
1/4 tsp Nutmeg
1/2 tsp Gluten-free baking powder
1/4 cup Erythritol
1/4 cup Butter (softened)
1 large Egg
1 tsp Vanilla extract

 

Instructions
1. In a medium bowl, stir together the almond flour, cinnamon, ground ginger, ground cloves, nutmeg, and baking powder.
2. In a large bowl, use a hand mixer to beat the butter and erythritol for 1-2 minutes, until fluffy. Beat in the egg and vanilla extract. Beat in the almond flour mixture until a dough forms.
3. Form the dough into a ball and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or until ready to bake.
4. Preheat the to 175 C /350 degrees F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper (you may need to do this twice for all the cookies).
5. Place the ball of dough between two large pieces of parchment paper. Roll out to 6mm  or 1/4″ thickness. Use a cookie cutter to cut out cookie shapes and transfer them to the parchment paper. (Transferring can be tricky because the dough is very soft. You can use a thin turner or flat spatula to help transfer each one.) When you’ve cut out all the shapes you can, re-form the remaining dough into a ball, roll it out again, and repeat, until you’ve used up all the dough.
6. Bake for 10-15 minutes, until golden on the edges. Cool on the cookie sheet before handling.

Read more at www.wholesomeyum.com

Coconut Flour Dinner Rolls! Extra Soft

Coconut Flour Dinner Rolls! Extra Soft

Ingredients
1/2 cup Coconut flour
2 tbsp Psyllium Husk powder
1/2 tsp Baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup Water
4 large eggs
4 tbsp Butter (better ghi, also is great if coconut is used instead of butter on room temperature)
Servings: 10 rolls

Instructions

Start by combining all of the dry ingredients(coconut flour, psyllium husk powder, baking powder, salt) and mixing thoroughly.
In a separate bowl start beating the eggs with a hand mixer. Add in melted butter and water and continue to mix until combine.
Pour the dry ingredients into the wet and continue mixing until the dough becomes thick and well mixed. If dough is not easily shapable by hand continue adding more psyllium husk powder until it is less sticky. For the desired consistency see the video above!
Form into 10 dinner rolls and place on a greased baking sheet or silicon baking mat. Larger rolls can be made if desired, just add a few minutes onto the baking time.
Bake for 30-35 minutes at 175 C (350F) degrees. Enjoy!

Read more at www.ketoconnect.net

Cauliflower Vegan Shepherds Pie

Cauliflower Vegan Shepherds Pie

Ingredients
2 tbs olive oil
1 onion diced
2 medium sized carrots peeled and diced
1 celery stalk diced
3 cloves garlic chopped
10 g dried wild mushrooms reconstituted in 2 1/2 tbs boiling water
500 g mushrooms diced
1 tbs thyme leaves roughly chopped
1 tbs tomato paste
1/4 cup red wine
1 cup vegetable stock
salt and pepper to taste

Mash:
650 g cauliflower
2 tbs olive oil
1 tbs dijon mustard
2 tsp thyme leaves
1 pinch ground nutmeg
salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 200 celsius (400 fahrenheit).
  2. Chop the cauliflower into roughly equal sized pieces and add to a large saucepan. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Season with salt and cook the cauliflower until tender. Drain.
  3. Place a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add the olive oil, onion, carrots and celery. Cook until slightly golden and caramelised. Add the mushrooms in 6 parts, making sure each batch is cooked before adding the next.
  4. Remove the wild mushrooms from the boiling water, reserving the water, and roughly chop. Add to the mushrooms along with the tomato paste. Increase the heat to medium-high and add the red wine. Cook until the red wine has almost evaporated before adding the mushroom soaking liquid and vegetable stock. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes or until roughly half of the liquid has been absorbed. Remove from the heat.
  5. Place the cauliflower in a food processor or high powered blender along with 2 tbs olive oil, the nutritional yeast, mustard, salt and thyme leaves. Blend until smooth and taste. Adjust seasonings as required and add the nutmeg and blend for a further minute.
  6. Divide the mushrooms between 4 large ramekins and top with the cauliflower mash. Bake for 20 minutes or until lightly golden.

Read more at www.deliciouseveryday.com

Option 2 with less ingredients but also very tasty:

Ingredients
2 tbs olive oil
250gr onion diced
3 cloves garlic chopped
500 g mushrooms diced
1 cup vegetable stock
2 smoked paprika
salt and pepper to taste

Mash:
650 g cauliflower
2 tbs olive oil
salt

Vegetarian option: for the Mush instead of olive oil add ghi and 20gr parmesan cheese.

Instructions: as described  in the original recipe (1st option)

Simple houmous

Simple houmous

“Chickpeas – the star ingredient in houmous – are incredibly good for you. High in protein and fibre and more than ten micronutrients, including a hefty amount of the mineral copper, keeping our hair and skin nice and healthy, this is a great, nutritious snack. Serve it with crunchy veg for dipping, breadsticks or lovely warm flatbreads. ”

SERVES 10
COOKS IN10 MINUTES
DIFFICULTYSUPER EASY

Ingredients
1 x 400 g tin of chickpeas
1 small clove of garlic
1 tablespoon tahini
1 lemon
extra virgin olive oil

Method
Drain and tip the chickpeas into a food processor.
Peel and add the garlic, then add the tahini, a good squeeze of lemon juice and 1 tablespoon of oil.
Season with a pinch of sea salt, then pop the lid on and blitz.
Use a spatula to scrape the houmous down the sides of the bowl, then blitz again until smooth.
Have a taste and add more lemon juice or a splash of water to loosen, if needed, then transfer to a serving bowl.
Serve with sliced crunchy veg, such as carrots, cucumbers, radishes or peppers, and some warm flatbreads.

 

Read more at www.jamieoliver.com

and more Jamie’s photos on

http://cdn.jamieoliver.com/foodrevolution/pdf/simple-houmous-fr-uk.pdf

Butternut squashed

Butternut squashed

“This is the easiest method for cooking squash. All the flavour is added at the last minute when you smash it in. Don’t panic if you’re tight for hob or oven space and the squash isn’t piping hot by the time you serve – it’s just as good warm. ”

SERVES 12
COOKS IN 2h 30min
DIFFICULTY not too tricky

Ingredients
2 butternut squash
50 g pine nuts
a few sprigs of fresh sage
extra virgin olive oil
½ fresh red chilli, optional
200 g vacuum-packed chestnuts
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
balsamic vinegar , optional

Method
Preheat the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas 4. Wash and dry the whole squash, then place on a baking tray. Pierce once or twice with the tip of a sharp knife, then bake in the oven for 1 hour 30 minutes, or until golden and very soft.
Scatter the pine nuts on a baking tray and toast them in the oven at the same time – they will only need a couple of minutes to turn golden, so make sure you keep an eye on them to prevent them burning.
Add a lug of oil to a frying pan, then pick in the sage leaves and fry until crisp. Remove to piece of kitchen paper to drain, reserving the oil.
Lay the cooked squash on a board, remove the stalks and, using a knife and tongs, carefully slice the squash lengthways, down the middle. Scoop out and discard the seeds.
Finely chop the chilli and crumble the chestnuts, then sprinkle over the squash halves with the cinnamon and a good pinch of black pepper. Really mash and chop all the lovely toppings into the squash with your knife, so all the flavours go right through.
Serve the squash halves topped with the crisp sage, the toasted pine nuts, a drizzle of the reserved sage oil and a little balsamic vinegar (if using).

Read more at www.jamieoliver.com

Almond Milk Cappuccino

Almond Milk Cappuccino

Ready in a matter of minutes and made in the comfort of your own kitchen: A dairy-free, free from sugary syrups, vegan and paleo friendly Almond Milk Cappuccino! So delicious and super easy to make!
Author: Joscelyn Abreu
Recipe type: Drink
Serves: 1 serving


Ingredients
1-2 shots of espresso or 4 ounces of strong coffee
¼ – ½ cup unsweetened almond milk, depending on how much milk you like in your coffee. Recipe to make your own almond milk here.*
Coconut Sugar or sweetener of choice, to taste
sprinkle of Cinnamon, optional
milk frother to foam milk

Instructions

Heat almond milk in a microwave safe mug for 30 seconds or in a small saucepan on the stove just until very warm. Meanwhile, begin to brew your coffee or espresso. Pour hot coffee/espresso into an 8 oz. mug and sweeten, to taste.
When the milk is heated, it’s time to froth. At this point you can mix in a bit of sugar/sweetener to your warmed milk, if you’d like. Submerge whisk part of the milk frother into the warmed milk and power on. Froth the milk for 20-30 seconds or until it begins to foam up and double in size.


Use a spoon to hold back the foam part of the milk and pour the rest of the warm milk into your coffee. Spoon the thick foam on top and sprinkle with a dash of cinnamon or garnish with a cinnamon stick. Makes 1 cappuccino.
*Not all brands of almond milk froth well. Blue Diamond, 365 brand Organic Almond Milk from Whole Foods, and Califia Farms Almondmilk work well for me.

Pročitajte više na Easy almond milk cappuccino

Zucchini soup

Zucchini soup

A delicious zucchini soup, easy to prepare

Ingredients

500 gr zucchini
2 onions
bunch of fresh parsley root ?
1 tsp kašičica soli
biber
bunch of fresh parsley
kisela pavlaka

Method

Izdinstati crni luk. Dodati krupno sečen koren peršuna, naliti vodom i kuvati dok ne omekša koren. Potom dodati krupno isečene tikvice, so i biber. Kada je povrće skuvano ispasirati štapnim mikserom. Dodati iscekan list peršuna i služiti. Čorba je izuzetno ukusna i kada se služi hladna, iz frižidera.

 

The Pleasure Of Health

Carob and Cocoa Cake

Carob and Cocoa Cake

Ingredients

5 eggs
5 table spoons coconut flour
2 table spoons carob
1 tale spoon cocoa
3 tablespoons Swerve sweetener  or allowed sweetener (or less, up to taste)
1 teaspoon baking powder
pinch of salt

3 table spoons coconut oil (leave it on room temperature or low heat to become liquid)
150ml coconut cream (or almond milk)
1 teaspoon coconut liquid stevia
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)

Instructions
Preheat oven to 180 degrees C / 350 degrees F.
Generously grease a 23 by 13cm or 9 by 5 inch loaf pan. (it is also great and easier if baking paper is used)
Whisk dry ingredients together. Set aside.

In a stand mixer beat the eggs then add the remaining wet ingredients to the mixer.
Once well blended pour half the dry ingredients into the wet and blend until combined.
Pour the remaining dry ingredients and blend until just combined.
Pour batter into loaf pan.
Sprinkle with optional coconut flakes if desired.
Bake 1 hour or until a skewer in center comes out clean.
Allow to cool 1 hour then take a knife and run it along the edges to loosen.
Carefully invert onto a serving plate or cutting board.
Allow to completely cool before slicing.
Best if kept refrigerated.

 

The Pleasure Of Health

The major branches of modern neuroscience

Branches of neuroscience can be broadly categorized in the following disciplines (neuroscientists usually cover several branches at the same time):

  • Affective neuroscience – in most cases, research is carried out on laboratory animals and looks at how neurons behave in relation to emotions.
  • Behavioral neuroscience – the study of the biological bases of behavior. Looking at how the brain affects behavior.
  • Cellular neuroscience – the study of neurons, including their form and physiological properties at cellular level.
  • Clinical neuroscience – looks at the disorders of the nervous system, while psychiatry, for example, looks at the disorders of the mind.
  • Cognitive neuroscience – the study of higher cognitive functions that exist in humans, and their underlying neural basis. Cognitive neuroscience draws from linguistics, psychology, and cognitive science. Cognitive neuroscientists can take two broad directions: behavioral/experimental or computational/modeling, the aim being to understand the nature of cognition from a neural point of view.
  • Computational neuroscience – attempting to understand how brains compute, using computers to simulate and model brain functions, and applying techniques from mathematics, physics, and other computational fields to study brain function.
  • Cultural neuroscience – looks at how beliefs, practices, and cultural values are shaped by and shape the brain, minds, and genes over different periods.
  • Developmental neuroscience – looks at how the nervous system develops on a cellular basis; what underlying mechanisms exist in neural development.
  • Molecular neuroscience – the study of the role of individual molecules in the nervous system.
  • Neuroengineering – using engineering techniques to better understand, replace, repair, or improve neural systems.
  • Neuroimaging – a branch of medical imaging that concentrates on the brain. Neuroimaging is used to diagnose disease and assess the health of the brain. It can also be useful in the study of the brain, how it works, and how different activities affect the brain.
  • Neuroinformatics – integrates data across all areas of neuroscience, to help understand the brain and treat diseases. Neuroinformatics involves acquiring data, sharing, publishing, and storing information, analysis, modeling, and simulation.
  • Neurolinguistics – studying what neural mechanisms in the brain control the acquisition, comprehension, and utterance of language.
  • Neurophysiology – looks at the relationship of the brain and its functions, and the sum of the body’s parts and how they interrelate. The study of how the nervous system functions, typically using physiological techniques, such as stimulation with electrodes, light-sensitive channels, or ion- or voltage-sensitive dyes.
  • Paleoneurology – the study of ancient brains using fossils.
  • Social neuroscience – this is an interdisciplinary field dedicated to understanding how biological systems implement social processes and behavior. Social neuroscience gathers biological concepts and methods to inform and refine theories of social behavior. It uses social and behavioral concepts and data to refine neural organization and function theories.
  • Systems neuroscience – follows the pathways of data flow within the CNS (central nervous system) and tries to define the kinds of processing going on there. It uses that information to explain behavioral functions.

Read more at www.medicalnewstoday.com

Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis

Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis

Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis

8 servings

Ingredients 

4 large eggs
1 cup coconut milk (240 ml / 8 fl oz) – I used Aroy-D
¼ cup granulated Erythritol or Swerve (50 g/ 1.8 oz)
1 cup almond flour (100 g/ 3.5 oz)
½ tsp vanilla powder or 1-2 tsp unsweetened vanilla extract (you can make your own)
⅛ tsp salt
2 tsp ghee or coconut oil for greasing
2 cups fresh or frozen berries: blackberries, raspberries and blueberries (300 g/ 10.6 oz)
1 tbsp powdered Erythritol or Swerve for dusting – I used Sukrin icing

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 175 C / 350 F. Place all the ingredients apart from the ghee and berries into a blender: eggs, coconut milk, Erythritol, almond flour, vanilla powder and salt.
  2. Pulse until smooth …
    Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis
    … for just a few seconds. Alternatively, mix in a bowl with a whisk.
  3. Grease a 9 to 10-inch flan dish with ghee and pour in the mixture. Add the berries: blackberries, raspberries and blueberries (wild blueberries contain less carbs than cultivated blueberries). Transfer into the oven and bake for 35-40 minutes.
    Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis
  4. The pie is ready when the top is golden brown and set. You can also test it by inserting a toothpick in centre. If it comes out clean, the pie is ready. Remove from the oven and let it cool down for 5 minutes.
    Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis
  5. Dust with powdered Erythritol, slice and serve.
    Keto Triple Berry Clafoutis

Read more at ketodietapp.com 

Video:

Neuroplasticity (source Britannica)

Neuroplasticity (source Britannica)

Neuroplasticity, capacity of neurons and neural networks in the brain to change their connections and behaviour in response to new information, sensory stimulation, development, damage, or dysfunction. Although neural networks also exhibit modularity and carry out specific functions, they retain the capacity to deviate from their usual functions and to reorganize themselves. In fact, for many years, it was considered dogma in the neurosciences that certain functions were hard-wired in specific, localized regions of the brain and that any incidents of brain change or recovery were mere exceptions to the rule. However, since the 1970s and ’80s, neuroplasticity has gained wide acceptance throughout the scientific community as a complex, multifaceted, fundamental property of the brain.

Rapid change or reorganization of the brain’s cellular or neural networks can take place in many different forms and under many different circumstances. Developmental plasticity occurs when neurons in the young brain rapidly sprout branches and form synapses. Then, as the brain begins to process sensory information, some of these synapses strengthen and others weaken. Eventually, some unused synapses are eliminated completely, a process known as synaptic pruning, which leaves behind efficient networks of neural connections. Other forms of neuroplasticity operate by much the same mechanism but under different circumstances and sometimes only to a limited extent. These circumstances include changes in the body, such as the loss of a limb or sense organ, that subsequently alter the balance of sensory activity received by the brain. In addition, neuroplasticity is employed by the brain during the reinforcement of sensory information through experience, such as in learning and memory, and following actual physical damage to the brain (e.g., caused by stroke), when the brain attempts to compensate for lost activity.

Today it is apparent that the same brain mechanisms—adjustments in the strength or the number of synapses between neurons—operate in all these situations. Sometimes this happens naturally, which can result in positive or negative reorganization, but other times behavioral techniques or brain-machine interfaces can be used to harness the power of neuroplasticity for therapeutic purposes. In some cases, such as stroke recovery, natural adult neurogenesis can also play a role. As a result, neurogenesis has spurred an interest in stem cell research, which could lead to an enhancement of neurogenesis in adults who suffer from stroke, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, or depression.

Types Of Cortical Neuroplasticity

Developmental plasticity occurs most profoundly in the first few years of life as neurons grow very rapidly and send out multiple branches, ultimately forming too many connections. In fact, at birth, each neuron in the cerebral cortex (the highly convoluted outer layer of the cerebrum) has about 2,500 synapses. By the time an infant is two or three years old, the number of synapses is approximately 15,000 per neuron. This amount is about twice that of the average adult brain. The connections that are not reinforced by sensory stimulation eventually weaken, and the connections that are reinforced become stronger. Eventually, efficient pathways of neural connections are carved out. Throughout the life of a human or other mammal, these neural connections are fine-tuned through the organism’s interaction with its surroundings. During early childhood, which is known as a critical period of development, the nervous system must receive certain sensory inputs in order to develop properly. Once such a critical period ends, there is a precipitous drop in the number of connections that are maintained, and the ones that do remain are the ones that have been strengthened by the appropriate sensory experiences. This massive “pruning back” of excess synapses often occurs during adolescence.

American neuroscientist Jordan Grafman has identified four other types of neuroplasticity, known as homologous area adaptation, compensatory masquerade, cross-modal reassignment, and map expansion.

Map expansion

Map expansion, the fourth type of neuroplasticity, entails the flexibility of local brain regions that are dedicated to performing one type of function or storing a particular form of information. The arrangement of these local regions in the cerebral cortex is referred to as a “map.” When one function is carried out frequently enough through repeated behaviour or stimulus, the region of the cortical map dedicated to this function grows and shrinks as an individual “exercises” this function. This phenomenon usually takes place during the learning and practicing of a skill such as playing a musical instrument. Specifically, the region grows as the individual gains implicit familiarity with the skill and then shrinks to baseline once the learning becomes explicit. (Implicit learning is the passive acquisition of knowledge through exposure to information, whereas explicit learning is the active acquisition of knowledge gained by consciously seeking out information.) But as one continues to develop the skill over repeated practice, the region retains the initial enlargement.

Read more at   www.britannica.com

Nordic Nut Bread

Nordic Nut Bread

Video recipe – whew … nuts are expensive. But this bread has still, in a short amount of time, become one of my favorite recipes. A bread which is made entirely from nuts, grains, seeds, eggs and oil. Everybody likes it. It is particularly good for cheese, charcuterie, Pâtés, etc. But it is also good with “ordinary” spreads. Or as a snack if you cut it into thin slices and roast it in a pan with a little butter.

Ingredients

Provides 1 loaf of 2.2 lbs, 20 slices of 1.8 oz. (Provides 1 loaf of 1 kg, 20 slices of 50 grams.)

dry ingredients

100 g (3.5 oz) pumpkin seeds
100 g (3.5 oz) sunflower seeds
100 g (3.5 oz) almonds
100 g (3.5 oz) walnuts
100 g (3.5 oz) linseed
100 g (3.5 oz) sesame seeds
100 g (3.5 oz) poppy seeds (optional)
2 tsp salt
wet ingredients

5 eggs
1 dl oil
1 dl water (optional)

Directions

Mix all the ingredients together, put the mass into a bread form. Lubricate if it is not “anti-stick”

1 quart (1 liter) bread form – bake for 1 hour at 320°F (160°C).

2 quarts (2 litres) bread form – bake for 1 hour at 320°F (160°C).

Notes

You will need approx. 1-2 eggs per 100 grams of nuts / grains / seeds, so it’s easy to add extra nuts if you would like a larger bread. If you add 100 g of nuts extra then add one more egg. If you then add an additional 100 grams more of nuts/seeds, then add 2 eggs as well. Contract.

If you do put in some extra nuts, be sure to add extra salt and oil too:

0.4 cup (1 dl) oil per 21 oz – 25 oz (600-700 g) extra nuts
1 teaspoon salt per 10 0z – 12 oz (300-350 g) extra nuts.
It is not very important as to what kind of nuts you use. If you are allergic or only have some nuts available, then just take 100 g extra of one of the kind you do have or can tolerate.

The bread lasts for 3-4 days in a drawer. A lot longer in the fridge.

The bread tend to be a bit on the dry side, so I often put in the optional water.

Mini nut bars

When you have to travel, or you need something for the lunchbox, it is also a good bread to bake in small cake molds / muffin tins. As a nutty “mini bread”. They should bake about 25 minutes.

Zucchini for a moister bread

1 grated zucchini (about 9 oz (250 g)) – you can also use carrot
1 egg extra
You can get a softer and more moist bread by grating a squash and put that in the dough. It goes moldy somewhat faster at room temperature, so it must be stored in the refrigerator.

Read more at www.kvalifood.com

Dairy-free chocolate mousse

Dairy-free chocolate mousse

AND VEGAN, TOO!

“Rustle up this smooth, creamy and super-chocolaty mousse in minutes, then whack it in the fridge ready to serve as a dinner-party dessert ”

MAKES 6
COOKS IN15 MINUTES PLUS CHILLING
DIFFICULTYSUPER EASY

Ingredients

150 g dairy-free dark chocolate , plus extra for serving
2 large ripe avocados
2 tablespoons cocoa powder
2 teaspoons vanilla bean paste
3 tablespoons maple syrup
1 x 160 g tin of coconut cream

Method

1. Place a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water, making sure the base doesn’t touch the water. Break the chocolate into the bowl and allow it to melt, then set aside to cool slightly.

2. Meanwhile, halve and stone the avocados, then scoop the flesh into a food processor, discarding the skins. Add the remaining ingredients and pulse for a few seconds. Scrape down the sides with a spatula, then pulse again to combine.

3. Pour in the cooled chocolate, then pulse a final time until creamy and smooth. Divide the mixture between six small bowls, then pop in the fridge to chill for at least 30 minutes. Serve with an extra grating of chocolate and a fresh fruit salad.

 

Read more at www.jamieoliver.com

Coconut Milk Whipped Cream

Coconut Milk Whipped Cream

Did you know you can make coconut whipped cream from pure canned coconut milk? Coconut whipped cream is the perfect vegan or lactose-free substitute for heavy cream!

How to Make Coconut Whipped Cream
400ml can full-fat coconut milk
1 teaspoon honey, optional

Flip the can of coconut milk upside down and refrigerate for at least 8 hours or overnight.After 8 hours or so in the fridge, you can open your can and you’ll see that the top of the coconut milk has solidified. Scoop the solidified coconut milk into your mixing bowl. Use the coconut “water” that remains in the can in smoothies!
Chill beaters and mixing bowl (optional) for 10-15 minutes before whipping cream.
Scoop solidified coconut milk into the chilled mixing bowl and beat for 5-8 minutes on medium speed until creamy, adding honey if desired. If cream begins to thin, refrigerate it again, and it will thicken back up, unlike normal heavy cream.
If making berry parfaits, layer berries and coconut cream in small jars or bowls and enjoy!
Whipped cream will stay good in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

 

Read more on www.healthy-liv.com

The quickest tomato sauce

The quickest tomato sauce

“This sweet tomato sauce is great on pizza, tossed through pasta… there’s so much you can use it for! ”


COOKS IN: 20 MINUTES
DIFFICULTY: SUPER EASY

Ingredients
olive oil
4 cloves garlic , peeled and finely sliced
1 bunch fresh basil , leaves picked and torn
3 x 400 g good-quality tinned plum tomatoes
sea salt
freshly ground black pepper

 

Method
Place a large non-stick frying pan on the heat and pour in 4 generous lugs of olive oil. Add the garlic, shake the pan around a bit and, once the garlic begins to colour lightly, add the basil and the tomatoes. Using the back of a wooden spoon, mush and squash the tomatoes as much as you can.
Season the sauce with salt and pepper. As soon as it comes to the boil, remove the pan from the heat. Strain the sauce through a coarse sieve into a bowl, using your wooden spoon to push any larger bits of tomato through. Discard the basil and garlic that will be left in the sieve, but make sure you scrape any of the tomatoey goodness off the back of the sieve into the bowl.
Pour the sauce back into the pan, bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and simmer for 5 minutes to concentrate the flavours. It will be ready when it’s the perfect consistency for spreading on your pizza.

Store the sauce in a clean jar in the fridge – it’ll keep for a week or so. Also great to freeze in batches or even in an ice cube tray, so you can defrost exactly the amount you need. But to be honest, it’s so quick to make, you might as well make it on the day you need it.

Read more on www.jamieoliver.com

Sugar Free Lemon Coconut Pound Cake

Sugar Free Lemon Coconut Pound Cake

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups coconut flour (1cup = 200ml)
1/2 cup Swerve sweetener
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
4 eggs
1/2 cup ghi, room temperature
150ml coconut cream (or almond milk)
3 teaspoons lemon zest
1 teaspoon vanilla extract (optional)
1 teaspoon coconut liquid stevia or lemon liquid stevia or just liquid stevia
optional topping: unsweetened coconut flakes or almond flakes

Instructions
Preheat oven to 180 degrees C or 350 degrees F.
Generously grease a 23 by 13cm or 9 by 5 inch loaf pan.
Whisk the first 4 ingredients together. Set aside.
In a stand mixer beat the eggs then add the remaining wet ingredients to the mixer.
Once well blended pour half the dry ingredients into the wet and blend until combined.
Pour the remaining dry ingredients and blend until just combined.
Pour batter into loaf pan.
Sprinkle with optional coconut flakes if desired.
Bake 1 hour or until a skewer in center comes out clean.
Allow to cool 1 hour then take a knife and run it along the edges to loosen.
Carefully invert onto a serving plate or cutting board.
Allow to completely cool before slicing.
Best if kept refrigerated.

Inspired by  www.sugarfreemom.com

Dopamine controls formation of new brain cells –  Karolinska Institutet

Dopamine controls formation of new brain cells –  Karolinska Institutet

A study of the salamander brain has led researchers at Karolinska Institutet to discover a hitherto unknown function of the neurotransmitter dopamine. In an article published in the prestigious scientific journal Cell Stem Cell they show how in acting as a kind of switch for stem cells, dopamine controls the formation of new neurons in the adult brain. Their findings may one day contribute to new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson’s.

The study was conducted using salamanders which unlike mammals recover fully from a Parkinson’s-like condition within a four week period. Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by the death of dopamine-producing cells in the mid-brain. As the salamander re-builds all lost dopamine-producing neurons, the researchers examined how the salamnder brain detects the absence of these cells. This question is a fundamental one since it has not been known what causes the new formation of nerve cells and why the process ceases when the correct number have been made.

What they found out was that the salamander’s stem cells are automatically activated when the dopamine concentration drops as a result of the death of dopamine-producing neurons, meaning that the neurotransmitter acts as a constant handbrake on stem cell activity.

“The medicine often given to Parkinson’s patients is L-dopa, which is converted into dopamine in the brain,” says Dr András Simon, who led the study at the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology. “When the salamanders were treated with L-dopa, the production of new dopamine-producing neurons was almost completely inhibited and the animals were unable to recover. However, the converse also applies. If dopamine signalling is blocked, new neurons are born unnecessarily.”

As in mammals, the formation of neurons in the salamander mid-brain is virtually non-existent under normal circumstances. Therefore by studying the salamander, scientists can understand how the production of new nerve cells can be resumed once it has stopped, and how it can be stopped when no more neurons are needed. It is precisely in this regulation that dopamine seems to play a vital part. Many observations also suggest that similar mechanisms are active in other animal species too. Further comparative studies can shed light on how neurotransmitters control stem cells in the brain, knowledge that is of potential use in the development of therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

“One way of trying to repair the brain in the future is to stimulate the stem cells that exist there,” says Dr Simon. “This is one of the perspectives from which our study is interesting and further work ought to be done on whether L-dopa, which is currently used in the treatment of Parkinson’s, could prevent such a process in other species, including humans. Another perspective is how medicines that block dopamine signalling and that are used for other diseases, such as psychoses, affect stem cell dynamics in the brain.”
The salamander is a tailed member of the frog family most known for its ability to regenerate lost body parts, such entire limbs.

Publication
Dopamine controls neurogenesis in the adult salamander midbrain in homeostasis and during regeneration of dopamine neurons.
Berg D, Kirkham M, Wang H, Frisén J, Simon A
Cell Stem Cell 2011 Apr;8(4):426-33

Source: Karolinska Institutet